My work is based on the idea that if a thing—an oak tree, a place on the landscape, or a built structure—can be seen as distinct and individual, with a unique history and personality, then it becomes harder to minimize its significance and easier to recognize its intrinsic value and importance.

I observe and intuit qualities of the individual character of the thing or place that I am drawn to photograph and then translate that through images and words. In one sense my work is documentary, using imagery to give voice to my personal experience. In another sense, it is political, pointing out the rapid loss of historic and culturally significant locations and trees to insensitive development for the sake of profit. 

In the case of my work with live oaks, what began as a simple exercise in creating a series of photographs of a subject that attracted me emotionally, has become a spiritual journey and a life’s work.

Over the past 30-plus years, my relationship with trees has led to the creation of six books, numerous magazine articles, exhibits, and multiple commissioned projects—all aimed at raising awareness for the cost of progress to the landscape and environment. I work with both film and digital tools to create prints on paper and canvas. I often paint the images with oils and pencils to reach my personal expressive goals.

Artist Statement

My work is based on the idea that if a thing—an oak tree, a place on the landscape, or a built structure—can be seen as distinct and individual, with a unique history and personality, then it becomes harder to minimize its significance and easier to recognize its intrinsic value and importance.

I observe and intuit qualities of the individual character of the thing or place that I am drawn to photograph and then translate that through images and words. In one sense my work is documentary, using imagery to give voice to my personal experience. In another sense, it is political, pointing out the rapid loss of historic and culturally significant locations and trees to insensitive development for the sake of profit. 

In the case of my work with live oaks, what began as a simple exercise in creating a series of photographs of a subject that attracted me emotionally, has become a spiritual journey and a life’s work.

Over the past 30-plus years, my relationship with trees has led to the creation of six books, numerous magazine articles, exhibits, and multiple commissioned projects—all aimed at raising awareness for the cost of progress to the landscape and environment. I work with both film and digital tools to create prints on paper and canvas. I often paint the images with oils and pencils to reach my personal expressive goals.