William Guion was introduced to photography in college and pursued his photographic training through a combination of self-study and participation as student and assistant in various West Coast photography workshops between 1985 and 1992. 

Following one of his instructor’s advice to “find something you love and photograph it again and again,” he began a series of live oak studies on his native soil of Louisiana that he has continued for more than three decades. At the same time, he followed a parallel career as a communications writer and editor. 

In 2000, after his father’s death, he moved to California to reconnect with his early inspirations and began a series of landscapes of oak woodlands across the golden hills of California's central coast. It was during this time that he became aware of the slow loss of oaks and oak woodlands through urban and agricultural expansion. 

Following the widespread destruction of Hurricanes Katrina and Rita in 2005, Guion returned to the South to continue his work with historic live oaks in an effort to photograph and document the oldest surviving oaks in Louisiana before they are lost.

Through his photographic images and writings, Guion makes the visual and intellectual connection between the centuries of human habitation and history that occurred near the spreading limbs of Louisiana's oldest oaks. These trees have been both witnesses and participants to the settlement and growth of the region and their stories are intertwined with the generations of human lives that have come and gone during their lifespan. 

He encourages others to view live oaks and other trees as individual sentient beings that are an essential part of the cultural history, ecology and lifestyle of this region. He also supports diverse organizations and groups that share his goal to preserve oaks and oak woodlands across the Southeast and West. 

Artist Statement

William Guion was introduced to photography in college and pursued his photographic training through a combination of self-study and participation as student and assistant in various West Coast photography workshops between 1985 and 1992. 

Following one of his instructor’s advice to “find something you love and photograph it again and again,” he began a series of live oak studies on his native soil of Louisiana that he has continued for more than three decades. At the same time, he followed a parallel career as a communications writer and editor. 

In 2000, after his father’s death, he moved to California to reconnect with his early inspirations and began a series of landscapes of oak woodlands across the golden hills of California's central coast. It was during this time that he became aware of the slow loss of oaks and oak woodlands through urban and agricultural expansion. 

Following the widespread destruction of Hurricanes Katrina and Rita in 2005, Guion returned to the South to continue his work with historic live oaks in an effort to photograph and document the oldest surviving oaks in Louisiana before they are lost.

Through his photographic images and writings, Guion makes the visual and intellectual connection between the centuries of human habitation and history that occurred near the spreading limbs of Louisiana's oldest oaks. These trees have been both witnesses and participants to the settlement and growth of the region and their stories are intertwined with the generations of human lives that have come and gone during their lifespan. 

He encourages others to view live oaks and other trees as individual sentient beings that are an essential part of the cultural history, ecology and lifestyle of this region. He also supports diverse organizations and groups that share his goal to preserve oaks and oak woodlands across the Southeast and West.