After the devastating one-two blow of Hurricanes Katrina and Rita in late 2005, I realized that many of the old trees I felt would be around through my lifetime could be lost overnight. 

I began to search for and document the very oldest surviving elder live oaks, the 100 largest and oldest in Louisiana – and called it The 100 Oaks ProjectI started with a search for the original 43 live oaks that were the original inductees into the Live Oak Society when it was first proposed by Dr. Edwin L. Stephens in 1934. From my original search, I found that almost 20% of these centenarian trees had been lost in the 75 years since the Society was founded, mostly due to urban expansion, development and violent storms.

You can view photos and stories from this work on the The 100 Oaks Project blog.    

The 100 Oaks Documentary Project

After the devastating one-two blow of Hurricanes Katrina and Rita in late 2005, I realized that many of the old trees I felt would be around through my lifetime could be lost overnight. 

I began to search for and document the very oldest surviving elder live oaks, the 100 largest and oldest in Louisiana – and called it The 100 Oaks ProjectI started with a search for the original 43 live oaks that were the original inductees into the Live Oak Society when it was first proposed by Dr. Edwin L. Stephens in 1934. From my original search, I found that almost 20% of these centenarian trees had been lost in the 75 years since the Society was founded, mostly due to urban expansion, development and violent storms.

You can view photos and stories from this work on the The 100 Oaks Project blog.